My most recent poem

The seeking sun swept vessels of a thousand rays of light

celestially they bear the mist beyond the blue and white

the fervent joy of bubble as they spin and skip away

purest light refracting through the gentle hum of spray

 

Rainbow coloured beauty being splashed across the cloud

illuminate the heavens as the water thinks aloud

like dragonfly that dart amidst the soft spun strands of gold

in between the night time, a woven love retold

 

Clearest crystal waters won’t conceal what lies below

I’ll cradle her within my arms throughout the ebb and flow

echo of the waters as they blend within the deep

the whisper of collision when we’re holding hands in sleep

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Weekends and World Championships

In a weekend of world championships, it has been something of a score draw for fan favourites. The Formula 1 racing world championship came down to the final race and the final few laps this season, as reigning champion and charismatic driver Lewis Hamilton lost the world championship to Nico Rosberg by just a few points.

Leading the race with five laps remaining, Hamilton could not win the world championship if Rosberg finished in the 2nd place he occupied at that point, and so controversially, Hamilton got tactical. He slowed down and attempted to back his rival and team mate into the clutches of the two cars which were just a few seconds behind. If Rosberg finished 4th, Hamilton would win the world title. Hamilton was told over the radio by senior members of the team who employ him, to speed up as the team were in danger of not winning the race. Hamilton simply came back over the radio and told them to keep out of it.

In the end, it wasn’t enough. Rosberg took 2nd in the race, and won the world title.  Hamilton’s future at team Mercedes now looks precarious.

On the other side of the world in New York, a young Russian named Sergey Karjakin was using ultra defensive tactics to try and frustrate the attacking brilliance of reigning chess world champion Magnus Carlsen. Over 12 games, he managed to hold the scores level at 6-6.

His frustrating tactics almost worked, as he forced Carlsen to overreach and lose a game, before he found a stellar performance to level the scores two games later. The world championship went to tiebreaker games for only the third time in history, and with Carlsen winning two of those, most of the chess world breathed a sigh of relief. The popular young champion and world number 1 retained his crown, but only just.